Tuesday, September 16, 2014

2014-09-15 (M) ESPeri.Impass

A neoprene fender washer was cut with a standard paper hole punch. One circle was made which had the original 3/32” hole so a small neoprene washer was created and a a 1/4” ID neoprene was left. Three more 1/4” diameter discs were made using the neoprene washer and hole punch.

 Punching a neoprene washer

Pieces punched from neoprene washer

A 1/4-20 brass bolt was purchased and the head was cut off using a band saw. The cut end was smoothed on a belt sander. A piece of 9/32" ID aluminum tubing was cut with a pipe cutter. The length was based on the length of the brass bolt, compass spinner, plug, and an extension spring which still needed to be constructed. The cut pipe was reamed with a phillips screwdriver which had a 9/32” diameter shaft.

 Aluminum pipe and components to go inside

Cut pipe next to components
Pipe being reamed with screwdriver

The thin brass rod was tightened between two nuts on a #4-40 threaded rod. The brass rod was tightly wound into the threads of the #4-40 threaded rod. The resulting spring was trimmed on one end.

 Tightening brass rod between two nuts

Spring wound on #4-40 threaded rod

Shaping an end with needle-nose pliers
Trimmed spring

The 1/4-20 brass segment had solder applied to the cut end. The newly wound brass spring had the trimmed end tinned with solder. The spring and threaded brass segment were joined so the heavy mass could hang by the spring.

 Solder on ends of brass pieces

Bolt piece hanging from spring
Assembled components next to aluminum tube

The magnet did not spin as freely inside the aluminum tubing which is possibly due to the induced current of the moving magnetic field. This effect can be observed by dropping a powerful magnet through a metal tube. It will fall much slower than gravity would suggest. Information can be found by researching Lenz's Law but the short story is that as the magnet moves by metal it induces a small current and electromagnetism is a direct result of current so the magnet will hug the metal and create friction.

To do:
  • Wrap longer spring with fine brass wire
  • Test + Evaluate longer spring design
  • Build tubular compass
  • Test + Evaluate tubular compass
  • Redesign, Rebuild, + Repeat
Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Monday, September 15, 2014

2014-09-14 (Su) Charged: DesertIrish

The group arrived at the Unnamed Cafe and took seats while uncharged people were there. Dawson spaced out thinking of how to arm a flying ship without military weaponry. Shana shared a little about her family which Dawson ignored. Jason shared his name and mentioned his sister. The owner of the cafe listened to the group describe the theft of the ship and learned that they were about to become outlaws. He cryptically mentioned he plotted rebellion in a cafe in another country forty years ago and designed part of his cafe around the cafe where he plotted long ago. Jason surmised he was referring the French protests of May 1968 and said some words in French. The waiter respond in kind and brought them French bread and seasoned olive oil. Dawson expressed his concern over weaponry.

To do:
  • Show how Shana knew Motor and Heather were a new couple
  • Reduce overuse of the word "power"
Total word count: 2 702 + 60 228 + 83 897 = 146 827 words

Journal page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Sunday, September 14, 2014

2014-09-13 (Sa) ESPeri.Impass

No significant feedback could be felt from the torsion spring tapping. The reason seemed to be the flex of the torsion spring between the inertial mass, the brass nut, and the tip touching the compass spinner was too great and the moment of impact was too long to send noticeable shocks.

The #4-40 nut was removed with a soldering iron and a #6-32 nut was put over the coil of the spring. The thin brass was trimmed so it no longer reached into the spacer. A short length of solid 1/16" diameter brass rod was cut and soldered to the side of the nut. The nut was placed back on the spring coil and positioned so that it would contact the reduced bolt on the compass spinner. The flexibility was reduced too far by putting the nut on the spring coil. Another spring could be wound or the tubular redesign could start.

 The #4-40 nut desoldered

Brass rod segment cut

Brass rod soldered to #6-32 brass nut 

Brass nut and rod installed on spring

To do:
  • Wrap longer spring with fine brass wire
  • Test + Evaluate longer spring design
  • Design tubular design with extension spring
  • Buy parts for tubular compass
  • Build tubular compass
  • Test + Evaluate tubular compass
  • Redesign, Rebuild, + Repeat
Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Saturday, September 13, 2014

2014-09-12 (F) ESPeri.Impass

A piece of flat brass stock was cut and bent around the flanged nylon spacer. This time the brass was tight enough that a rubber band was not necessary to hold it in place. Another spring was made with the narrow brass bar stock but a larger diameter was chosen to increase the flexibility. Instead of wrapping it around a toothpick the bar stock was wrapped around a pen shaft. The pen shaft was roughly 9.5mm in diameter. The flexibility was still insufficient.

 Bending the flat bar stock with pliers

The first two bends of the spacer holder

Spacer holder made from brass bar stock

Spring wound on pen

A small brass rod 0.016" (0.406mm) in diameter was purchased in order wind a new spring. A toothpick was used as the core for winding the spring. The spring was cut away from the rest of the stock. A z-bend was added to one of the torsion spring arms in order to reach into the flanged spacer. Solder was applied to the straight spring arm and the flat bar stock used to hold the nylon spacer. The two were joined so the tip of the bent spring arm rests just above the reduced bolt on the compass spinner. A #4-40 brass nut was soldered to the bent spring arm to add inertia.

 Small diameter brass bar stock

Z-Bend in torsion spring

Solder on spacer holder and spring

Positioning torsion spring

Nut soldered to spring

To do:
  • Test + Evaluate
  • Design tubular design with extension spring
  • Redesign, Rebuild, + Repeat

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, September 12, 2014

2014-09-11 (Th) ESPeri.Impass

A 2.5mm bolt was clamped into locking pliers and the head was reduced using a grinder. The bolt was turned twice so 3/4 of the head was removed. The modified bolt was inserted into the magnet. Since the bolt was ferrous it held itself in place. The magnet and bolt assembly was put back into the flanged spacer to confirm that the spring could tough the remaining bolt head. However the spring needed to travel nearly 1/8" or 3mm to reach the bolt head. A brass #6 nut was soldered to the spring arm to add inertia. A #6 bolt was added to the nut to add more inertia but it was still insufficient to tap the reduced bolt head on the compass spinner.

 Holding bolt with locking pliers

Reduced bolt

Reduced bolt

Reduced bolt next to magnet

Reduced bolt in magnet

Nut soldered to spring

Reassembled unit

Bolt for added inertia 

Spinning the compass with its reduced bolt

To do:
  • Wind weaker spring
  • Add mass to spring
  • Test + Evaluate
  • Redesign
  • Rebuild
  • Repeat

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Thursday, September 11, 2014

2014-09-10 (W) Smart Pocket Watch

The Sony MN800 LiveView arrived by USPS. The box was in poor condition and appeared to be a reconditioned or returned item. The unit and accessories were in acceptable condition. Two faux pocket watches had been purchased. The crystal of one was removed by pushing from the back. The crystal was brittle plastic and shattered messily and even broke the skin. To modify the frame to accept the watch notches needed to be cut from the watch with the crystal intact. A white PSA label was stuck on. The excess label was trimmed away and the notch positions were clearly marked on the label. The notches were cut away using a cut-off wheel in a rotary tool. The heat from the cutting caused the thermal label to change color and the crystal fell out but remained intact. The notches were smoothed with a narrow grinding wheel which quickly fouled but sufficiently smoothed the notches. The two watch faces fit together but made a large gap along the side.

 Broken plastic and broken skin

Faux pocket watch covered with label

Notches marked on faux pocket watch

Cutting notches out

 Smart watch resting in notch holes

Faux pocket watches enclosing smart watch

To do:
  • Trim tops of watches
  • Find suitable background
  • Insulate top watch
  • Fill around watch
  • Build buttons
  • Install buttons
  • Make is possible to disassemble unit at will

Journal page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

2014-09-09 (Tu) ESPeri.Impass

Thin bar, narrow bar, and rod brass stock was purchased from a local hobby store. The concept was to tap on the top of a compass spinner but contact would only be made when the spinner has a raised portion under the tapper. This raised portion will be metal to give the shortest moment of impact.

The wide bar brass was bent using pliers and fingers since it was thin. A shape was made to hold the flanged bearing in place with the help of a rubber band. A small brass bar, 1/64" x 1/32" (0.396mm x 0.793mm) was bent around a toothpick to form a torsion spring. The spring was soldered to the spacer holder then bent so the spring reached into the space to be near the compass spinner. The spinner was supported by a small steel bearing held to the magnet by virtue of its own magnetism. The method had the advantage of self centering the pivot point and a low profile. A video was made to show the spinner working.

 Bending the bar stock into a shape

Forming bar stock around flanged spacer

Thin rod stock and toothpick

Forming torsion spring

Brass torsion spring

Torsion spring soldered to spacer holder

Rubber band holding spacer to brass parts

Magnet with bearing to act as pivot

Video of compass spinner being rotated

To do:

  • Install tapping weight
  • Test + Evaluate
  • Redesign
  • Rebuild
  • Repeat


Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.