Sunday, November 23, 2014

2014-11-22 (Sa) Arduino Laser Tag

The tape was peeled from the painted plastic and came away cleanly. There was concern the paint would not from a clean edge since the paint was allowed to dry with the tape in place. The paint was still tacky to the touch but was not affected by light contact.

Clear window in the paint job

A second screen arrived by mail. The header pins were removed by clipping the plastic between each one then prying the pin out while applying heat from a soldering iron. Wires from an ethernet cable were salvaged for the first eight wires which were soldered in in place of the header pins. A spare wire took the place of the ninth connection.

 Headerless screen and salvaged wires

Wires soldered in place

Double-sided foam tape was applied to the screen PCB and trimmed. A second layer of tape was applied to build up the thickness beyond the height of the actual screen. The screen was stuck to the painted plastic so the screen was right-side-up and lined up with the clear window.

 Tape applied to screen PCB

Two layers of tape
Screen behind window

Glue was applied to the face of an RJ11 socket which was placed behind the 1/2" (13mm) hole so the port was accessible through the hole. The glue seemed to dissolve the paint which had not fully dried. The painted side had been placed on the inside of the clear plastic to keep it from being scratched away. The tagger will still be prone to this cosmetic damage but the clear plastic would expose the electronics while the rest of the device has color PVC underneath.

 RJ11 socket glued from back

Everything held neatly in place

Paint distorted by glue

To do:
  • Draft schematics
  • Break down tasks further
  • Build vests
  • Build another tagger
  • Make instructions for all parts
 Journal Page 1

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-11-20 (Th)

Saturday, November 22, 2014

2014-11-21 (F) Arduino Laser Tag

A draft was made with the measurements of the screen and breakout board. The intention was to tape the cutout to the plastic before painting so a window would remain free of paint. Double-sided tape was not available so electrical tape pieces were cut into the screen's dimensions and put on the plastic over the screen area. Paint was applied to the tape side while the other side remained covered in its shipping tape. The paint was allowed to dry overnight in a heated garage.

 Drawing under plastic sheet

Tape covering screen area
Painted plastic covers

To do:
  • Draft schematics
  • Break down tasks further
  • Build vests
  • Build another tagger
  • Make instructions for all parts


Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-11-19 (W)

Friday, November 21, 2014

2014-11-20 (Th) Arduino Laser Tag

 A quick reminder to check out VU by Vilucid, the KickStarter for some wearable technology which my friend has invented.

Enough background.
----------

A second vest unit was assembled with a 5V Arduino Pro Mini. Instead of stripping two lengths of four-conductor telephone wire a single length of eight-conductor wire was stripped of its sheath. The color code of the schematic was not changed since the colors corresponded to the RJ11 sockets.

Desheathed eight-conductor cable

A problem with the first attempt was the sire insulation which was not pierced by the blades of the RJ11 keystone socket. The wires from the eight-conductor cable were pierced every time they were checked. A potentiometer was added as the identity setter by bending the leads around and soldering to the surface of the of Arduino. Power wires were added. The ends were stripped and tinned then terminated on a two-position terminal strip.

 Power wire added

Potentiometer added
Terminal strip added

To do:
  • Draft schematics
  • Break down tasks further
  • Create vest mount for controller, battery, and terminal strip
  • Build another test unit
  • Make instructions for all parts

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-11-17 (M)

Thursday, November 20, 2014

2014-11-19 (W) Arduino Laser Tag

A double d-ring cotton belt was purchased from a thrift store. Holes were marked so that a pistol harness could be attached and worn comfortably by a person with a small or large frame. A scratch awl was used to make 3/16" (4mm) holes in the fabric without cutting fibers. Eyelets were inserted in the holes and crimped with an eyelet tool. The vest was assembled and tested well.

 Cotton double d-ring belt

Scratch awl pushed through belt

Belt with added eyelets

Back view of vest

Front view of vest

To do:
  • Draft schematics
  • Break down tasks further
  • Create vest mount for controller, battery, and terminal strip
  • Build another test unit
  • Make instructions for all parts

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-11-16 (Su)

Wednesday, November 19, 2014

x2014-11-18 (Tu) VU KickStarter

One month ago I went to 2014-10-18 (Sa) IoTHackDay. I met with a team of five and we made something cool. Marissa Sundquist was on my team and full of ideas. The idea of head-mounted screens was not new to her and now she is launching a KickStarter. I have been lucky enough to work with her and get a peek into the way she works on her projects.                                Relentless.



I have contributed time to her project by helping with product construction, consulting, and editing. I have also contributed financially because I think this is something that will be a great piece of technology and because it's going to be an important step to connecting ourselves without looking like technophiles.

Enough background.
----------

The entrepreneur Marissa Sundquist asked for help spotting errors on her KickStarter page. A detailed report was made regarding changes to the page. The report was 923 words. Work with her VU project has been kept off the blog due to secrecy of her pending patent.

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-11-18 (Tu)

2014-11-18 (Tu) Arduino Laser Tag

A 7/64" (3.5mm) drill bit was used to drill the #6 (3mm) holes in the acrylic sheets which will cover the tagger enclosures. Only the holes for mounting to the enclosure were drilled. The extra holes marked for the RJ11 phone sockets were left. The two drilled panels were cut out on a band saw. The edges were smoothed and the corners were rounded on a belt sander. 1/2" (13mm) holes were drilled to pass the RJ11 phone plugs. The sockets will likely be glued in place rather than held with bolts

 Drill bit and bolt

Using a band saw to cut the basic shape out

Finished pieces on enclosure
1/2" hole with RJ11 socket below

To do:
  • Draft schematics
  • Break down tasks further
  • Create vest mount for controller, battery, and terminal strip
  • Build another test unit
  • Make instructions for all parts

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-11-14 (F)

Tuesday, November 18, 2014

2014-11-17 (M) Arduino Laser Tag

A design was created for the screen holder which was no more than a clear plastic cover on the tagger enclosure. A window will be created by spray painting the panel except for the screen area which will be masked off with tape. This adds complication since the the RJ11 phone connector cannot be attached using a keystone (modular) part. Glare resistant acrylic sheeting was purchased to act as the enclosure cover. A switch box cover with two RJ11 sockets was purchased and the sockets were unfastened from the faceplate.

 Wall mount RJ11 unit with one socket removed

The PVC tagger enclosure had tape applied to the edges to protect it from marking. The outline of the enclosure was traced on to the acrylic sheet. Five outlines were traced but only two will be cut immediately. The mounting holes for the enclosure were also marked by looking through the plastic. Holes were marked for mounting the phone socket but they will likely be glued in place.

Tracing with taped enclosure

Marking unnecessary holes

To do:
  • Draft schematics
  • Break down tasks further
  • Create vest mount for controller, battery, and terminal strip
  • Build another test unit
  • Make instructions for all parts
  •  
Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-11-13 (Th)