Tuesday, September 30, 2014

2014-09-29 (M) Smart Pocket Watch

A larger conductive surface was made for the backside of the smart watch by inserting two more copper strips. On the front of the smart watch long copper strips were attached to each strip already attached but no solder was applied. The strips on the face of the watch were covered with electrical tape strips trimmed to size to insulate them from the chassis.

 Larger conductive patch on backside of clamshell

Foil strips applied to front of smart watch
Insulated strips on front of smart watch

The insulating tape strips were severed part way and the scrap was moved closer to the end to make a break in the insulation where it can be accessed like a touch sensor. The strips were trimmed and wrapped around the plastic hoop. The touch sensors will not work reliably while the clamshell is closed. This suggests the problem is due to tension via the wooden arcs or stray conductivity. Each of these problems can be addressed. Another issue could be the conduction between the chassis and the switch foil. It may be beneficial to only apply copper foil on the screen but not the side of the smart watch.

4mm breaks in the insulation

 Smart watch inserted into clamshell

 Foil adhered to plastic loop

Uncropped spinning photo made with Rotational Photography Rig

To do:
  • Insulate both sides of foil
  • Add slack between watch and wooden arcs
  • Remove foil from sides of smart watch
  • Reduce diameter of plastic at top of plastic hoop
  • Repaint plastic hoop
  • Clear coat on plastic hoop

Journal Page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.


This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Monday, September 29, 2014

2014-09-28 (Su) Smart Pocket Watch

I had hoped to finish this project today but rerouting the buttons seemed impossible. Today I think I cracked it.

Originally the smart pocket watch was supposed to be a weekend project. I figured it wouldn't take more than a few days to slap a smart watch inside a pocket watch frame and reroute some buttons. I was wrong but this has been a pretty rewarding project. I hadn't done any plastic bending since high school. I hadn't used model paint in a long time and I realized how useful it can be. Wearing this smart watch convinced me to buy a more modern one which can be seen in some of my pictures. This showed me that copper foil tape is a really handy conductor which can be used on so many surfaces. If this were combined with conductive paint a whole world of possibilities opens up.

Enough background.
----------

The two wooden arcs used on the sides were sanded using 80 grit paper on a clipboard to provide a flat surface and a secure clip for one side of the abrasive sheet. More attempts were made to control the screen while inside the clamshell. Methods which worked reliably suddenly stopped when inserted into the clamshell. A phenomenon was notice where the remote switches worked reliably while the watch was held but failed to operate while the watch was suspended by the foil tape. The methods also failed if the watch was set on a wooden desk.

 80 grit sand paper on a clipboard

Tape run over the wooden arc 

Tape applied to the wooden arc

Soldered joint between pieces of tape

To remedy this problem a strip of copper tape was applied to the back of the watch and another was put inside the watch frame on the back side. This method of selectively isolating the chassis from the screen but connecting the watch and the clamshell seemed effective.

Tape on inside of clamshell and back of watch

To do:
  • Construct and isolate virtual buttons
  • Construct arcs to hold clamshell shut

Journal Page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.


This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Sunday, September 28, 2014

2014-09-27 (Sa) Smart Pocket Watch

Different shapes of erasers were cut out to go inside foil tape wraps to press against the smart watch screen. Most shapes were ineffective or unreliable. A strip of copper foil tape was cut and adhered directly to the edge of the smart watch where the touch sensor was thought to be. Reliable results were seen with this method. The screen could even be acted upon by touching the foil with scissors so long as the metal cutting shears made skin contact. The foil cut for this first attempt was 24mm long.

 Attempt at wrapping the arc spacers with foil tape

Different shapes of erasers

24mm strip of copper foil

Copper foil on smart watch

Highly reliable copper tape method

All four sides were given foil tape strips before it was inserted into the pocket watch clamshell. Another piece of foil tape was attached to the right side of the screen. The interaction was unreliable inside the clamshell, presumably because of the conductivity of the faux pocket watches. Shorter strips of copper foil tape were cut, 15mm this time, which still yielded reliable touch sensitivity. Inside the clamshell the reliability still suffered. The foil on the face of the smart watch has been covered in electrical tape is untested due to the short battery life of the smart watch.

 Copper strips cut for watch

Smart watch outfitted with copper foil tape

Smart watch inside clamshell

Reliability of copper tape on top of other tape

Shorter strips to go on watch

Insulating tape cut to cover watch

Insulated watch

To do:
  • Test covered foil virtual buttons
  • Install latch on watch clamshell

Journal Page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.


This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Saturday, September 27, 2014

2014-09-26 (F) Smart Pocket Watch

The screen presses were unreliable so several methods were tried to make contact. Fumbling and experimentation showed that the very edge was the ideal place to touch. The corner where the screen and chassis meet may be some kind of conductivity gap. The foil currently on the plastic ring was bent over the edge and some reaction was seen but only when significant pressure was applied directly above the edge. Similar unreliable results were seen when pushing the foil down with a dielectric (high polymer eraser) and touching the copper.

Holding the foil against the smart watch

Holding the foil down with an eraser

Slices of the eraser were taken with different thicknesses to try to push the foil into place from the inside. Different shapes were experimented with. A spare crystal was held over the smart watch while eraser slices held the crystal away from the surface of the smart watch. Part of the unresponsiveness of the foil may be due to pressure on the smart watch's crystal when inside the clamshell. The smart watch has a convex crystal.

 Slices of erasers with poor brightness control

Different shapes of eraser slices which were experimented with

Testing the copper while a crystal was held above the smart watch crystal

Eraser slice inside the clamshell

To do:

  • Devise reliable screen interaction method
  • Install reliable screen interaction method
  • Install latch on watch clamshell

Journal Page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.


This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Friday, September 26, 2014

2014-09-25 (Th) Smart Pocket Watch

If you glance at the handwritten journals you may notice a few things. The first thing is that I have atrocious handwriting. The second is that I misspell words from time to time because I rush through the handwritten journal to get here. The third thing is more recent, I have been posting journals out of order. This is not an attempt to cheat you but instead an attempt to give a little more continuity to the posts from day to day. I hope you enjoy.

Enough background.
----------


Adhesive copper foil tape was purchased from a stained glass supply store. A 45mm length was cut and a small piece of foam double-sided tape was placed on the sticky side 15mm from one end. The selected end was folder over so the tape was covered and some of the foil tape stuck to itself. The remaining adhesive was wrapped around the bottom of the painted plastic ring.

 1/4" (8mm) copper foil tape

45mm of copper foil tape with a segment of foam tape applied 15mm from one end

Copper foil wrapped over double sided tape

Foil tape was wrapped so it finished on the inside of the loop

The point of the foil tape was to provide a way to reach the sides of the watch which were touch sensitive. As long as this was a capacitive touch switch it would work to place a conductor on the screen and route it elsewhere.



To do:

  • Install the rest of the copper tape
  • Test remote switches
  • Install latch on watch clamshell


Journal Page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.


This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Thursday, September 25, 2014

2014-09-24 (W) Smart Pocket Watch

The lens taken from the scrapped pocket was was measured. The diameter of the lens was 1 9/16 inches (~1.6 inches) (40.5mm). A photograph of a gear box was modified with the fisheye distortion in GIMP and printed at a diameter of 1.6 inches. The print was cut out and placed inside the pocket watches opposite the watch face.

 Measurement of lens

Printout of gear graphic

Gear graphic placed in watch

The lens was glued in place with super glue and allowed to dry. Some clouding of the lens was observed near the glue. Better ventilation would have reduced this effect. Two rotating images were made using the Rotating Photography Rig. One picture was made with a white background and the other was made a black background. The watch was suspected on a free standing hook structure made from pliable galvanized steel wire. The image was cropped and animated with GIMP.

Lense being glued to faux pocket watch

White background rotational photograph

Black background rotational photograph

Gear photograph distorted with fisheye effect

To do:

  • Install latching mechanism
  • Install copper tape


Journal Page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.


This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

2014-09-23 (Tu) Smart Pocket Watch

A scrap of 1/2" plywood was cut to test the thickness inside the watch and see if it would serve as a suitable brace. The scrap held the watch faces nearly parallel. The edge of the watch was traced on the edge of the scrap plywood and cut out on a band saw. The arc of wood was reduced on a belt sander until the thickness and arc matched the space between the smart watch and the inside rim of the faux pocket watch clamshell. Two more arc pieces were made by cutting and sanding bits of the scrap plywood. The tension of the wood pieces could hold the clamshell closed not they must be tucked inside when the watch was closed.

 Scrap of plywood holding the clamshell apart

Arc traced on plywood

Refining plywood arc

Only three were needed but four were made

Plywood pieces surrounding smart watch

 Clamshell, smart watch, and plywood spacers

Side view showing parallel watch faces

To close the gap around the rim of the watch a metal ring was purchased as part of a clevis pin. The first attempt to cut the ring on a band saw failed due to a low tooth count blade. A curt-off wheel in an angle grinder was used to trim the ends so the ring could be bent around and make a nearly complete circle. The ends were tested so they pointed to one another. The ring however was too twisted to lie flat so it would not make a good fit to fill the gap.

 Using an angle grinder to cut metal ring

Metal ring cut enough that it can form a complete circle

Bending the wire ring with a piece of steel

Twisted ring unsuitable for use in this project

4mm (0.156") diameter plastic rods were purchased from a hobby store. Solid rods, not tubes. A capped piece of 1 1/2" PVC with a hold was selected since its diameter was close to the faux pocket watches. A plastic rod was inserted into the ole for holding and a heat gu was used to bend the plastic around the PVC. The plastic rod was trimmed to keep the most uniform parts of the cycle and reheated to complete the circle. The circle was slightly larger than the faux pocket watches so it was trimmed until touching the ends created the correct diameter. The circular rod was heated uniformly and pinched shut until it cooled. The ends were trimmed until the hinge could pass between them to shut.

 4mm plastic rods

1 1/2" PVC and heat gun
  
 Heat gun used to wrap rod around PVC pipe

Plastic rod being wrapped around PVC pipe

 Nearly full circle of plastic rod

Trimming plastic rod with wire cutter

 Shortened plastic rod segment

Reformed plastic circle

Plastic rod around plywood pieces

The plastic and wood were painted with modeling paint called "Gun Metal" which seemed to be a close match to the watch. The plastic's flexibility allowed the buttons to be pressed without appearing conspicuous.

 Painted pieces

Watch shown from side

Watch shown from top

To do:
  • Find a suitable background. Gears or faux metal
  • Add copper contacts on the side of the bezel
  • Add lens to the back over the background
  • Find a method to securely close clamshell




 Journal Page 1

Journal Page 2


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.


This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.