Friday, October 31, 2014

2014-10-30 (Th) Arduino Laser Tag

38mm lenses with a 50mm focal length were purchased at a lab supply store. 1 1/4" PVC thread to smooth adapters were purchased. The threaded adapters allow for fine tuning of each module before the pieces are solvent welded. The threaded cap is flat and uniform thickness so it provides a good surface for attaching an LED. A 1/4" (5mm) hole was drilled in the center of the plug. A piece of 1" (25mm) diameter wooden down was cut to approximately 3 inches (75mm). This dowel will act as an interface between the emitter assembly and a 1" scope mount.

 Drilling threaded plug

Components for emitter assembly

Judging length for dowel. Approximately 3" (75mm)

A side of the wooden dowel was sanded flat and a side of the threaded/smooth adapter was sanded flat. Two 3/16" (4.5mm)  holes were drilled through the dowel perpendicular to the flat side. Matching holes were drilled into the flat of the PVC adapter. The holes at the top of the wood were countersunk. The idea is to fasten them together with #10 countersunk bolts.

Flattened dowel and flattened PVC coupler

Flattened parts fitting together

Drilling dowel and PVC coupler

Countersinking dowel

To do:
  • Build two working taggers
  • Update team colors with NeoPixels
  • Order color screens
  • Find replacement receiver enclosures
  • Program for color screen
  • Make instructions for all parts

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-09-15 (M)

Thursday, October 30, 2014

2014-10-29 (W) Arduino Laser Tag

3/4" PVC couplers and caps were purchased. Two of the four couplers were trimmed down by 1/2" (12mm) on each side to expose more of the pipe and allow for more adjusting. One coupler was cut at an angle on one side to give it a hooded look. This was done for aesthetics more than utility. The cut end was sanded to smooth the edges. Small rings were cut from the PVC pipe to act as lens holders in the couplers. The caps were drilled with a 1/4" (5mm) bit. The caps had a thinner end but were rounded. The flat end will likely be the better choice for lining up the IRLEDs. The couplers were were not shortened were drilled and tapped to 1/4-20 threads.

 Cutting 1/2" (12mm) from each side of coupler

Angled coupler cut

Small PVC rings

1/4" (5mm) holes drilled in rounded caps

Tapped PVC coupler

To do:
  • Update team colors with NeoPixels
  • Order color screens
  • Order lenses
  • Find replacement receiver enclosures
  • Program for color screen

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-09-11 (T)

Wednesday, October 29, 2014

2014-10-29 (W) Finger Speaker Coil

Information on Transhumanism in the Minnesota metropolitan area can be found at twin-cities-transhumanists.org

Discussions about biohacking can be found at http://discuss.biohack.me/

Enough background.
----------

Following a thread on discuss.biohack.me a set of “Invisible Headphones” was modified to have an RCA phono connection between the amplifier and the coil. This was an unbroken wire. The wire was cut, stripped, and tinned before the female inline RCA socket was soldered to the amplifier end of the wire and an RCA plug was soldered to the coil end of the wire. The set was tested to ensure the connection was still good.

"Invisible Headphones"


Wire to coil being cut and tinned

Phono connectors on coil wire

The different coils were made from magnet coil wire. 150mm (6”), 1000mm (3’), and 3000mm (9’). The shortest length was wrapped around a felt tip marker barrel. The middle length was wrapped around a standard size disposable pocket lighter. The longest length was wrapped around the same felt tip marker.

 Three coils and their lengths

 Shortest coil being wrapped

 Medium coil being wrapped

Longest coil being wrapped

There was a negligible difference between the three coils. All three were tested with a foam earplug containing a magnet as well as two implanted finger magnets. The first implanted magnet was a silicone magnet designed by Steve Haworth. The second implanted magnet was a TiN coated M31 magnet sold by Dangerous Things. The most effective method and greatest range was seen with the standard coil included with the “Invisible Headphones.”

Grinding primer describing the magnet earplug


Different angles were tested with all coils and the most effective method was to wrap the coil around the palm three times and insert the implanted fingertip into the ear canal while moving the coil near the magnet and ear. Sufficient volume was obtained. Placing a sufficiently large coil behind the ear could be enough to provide sound when a magnet is brought close to the ear.

 Coil wrapped around hand

Coil held near ear

 Journal Page 1

Journal Page 2

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-10-28 (W) Arduino Laser Tag

What can I say about laser tag? What can I say without turning into a squealing, excited little kid? Nadalot. My friends and I would play weekly games of laser tag at the local arena and it was there that I got it in my head to build laser tag guns, or taggers, as they are called. It wasn't an issue of saving money but wanting to play laser tag anywhere.

I have tried building taggers entirely from PVC and that has its drawbacks. I have tried making taggers entirely from wood and that is time consuming. The biggest problems are making something that is durable, modular for easy repair or replacement, and something that can have electronics added. The current plan is to retrofit plastic replica guns with electronics.

The programming has been done for Arduino so it will be accessible to many people who may want to make changes. The receivers are already conceived so I won't be making changes to that except for sourcing different parts.

One of the biggest problems is making emitters for the infrared LEDs which transmit shots. I want to make something easily reproducible so other people can duplicate my results and affordable enough that anyone build their own system. Another issue I want to tackle is finding or making an enclosure.

This is not the first laser tag game to be programmed for Arduino. Here is one by j44.

Enough background.
----------

A piece of 3/4”  PVC pipe was measured to be cut for two lengths, 40mm and 45mm. 45mm is the focal length of the lenses being used but the fit of the PVC components suggested having a shorter piece could be important for getting the LED the correct distance from the lens. The second piece was also to act as a holder to wedge the lens in place. Each piece was cut by hand using a hack saw so the angles were not perpendicular.

 45mm measurement on 3/4" PVC

 45mm measurement on 3/4" PVC

A hand hack saw is a terrible way to cut this squarely

A 1/4” drill bit was selected to drill the hole for a 5mm LED socket holder. The LED was to be mounted in a 3/4” PVC cap with a flat end. A pilot hole was drilled then the 1/4” bit followed. The 40mm and 45mm PVC pieces were drilled and tapped to 1/4-20 threads.

 1/4" bit and 5mm LED socket holder

Pilot hole into PVC cap

1/4" hole in PVC cap

LED socket in PVC cap

Drilled and tapped PVC segment

The lens was placed on top of the 45mm PVC segment then covered with the coupler and the 40mm segment in the other end. A red LED and a battery were plead in the LED socket holder and snugged together until a focused image of the red LED was visible on a nearby white wall. A video was made of the focusing process.

 Assembly order

Segments assembled

Lens installed

Red LED in PVC

Red LED focusing video

To do:
  • Update team colors with NeoPixels
  • Order color screens
  • Order lenses
  • Find replacement receiver enclosures
  • Program for color screen

Journal Page

The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

2014-09-11 (W)

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

2014-10-27 (M) tDCS Unit

Pictures were taken of the electrodes, electrode wires, salt water, and electrode placement on a subject. Instructions were written to prepare and apply the electrodes. Warnings were written. The pictures and additional steps were in the vein of many other Instructables which have multiple related instructions in a single step. The images were appropriately edited to label the anode and cathode electrodes.




Journal Page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Monday, October 27, 2014

2014-10-26 (Su) tDCS Unit COMPLETED

The Instructable for the tDCS Unit was completed to the end of the workshop manual but a photo should be taken showing the electrodes being used. The images on the first step were touched up and graphics and text were applied by Jennifer Domeier. The Instructable will be published during the week to hopefully expose more people to tDCS. The Instructable  for the DIY Helping Hands was also written but not published yet for the same reason.


Journal Page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.

Sunday, October 26, 2014

2014-10-25 (Sa) tDCS Unit

The assembly instructions images were scaled using a bulk resize function of IrfanView. A two day old version of the manual was opened since it didn't contain of the the high resolution images. The placeholder images were replaced quickly this time but the old version still needed to have steps added and removed. Two new pictures were taken after the camera was set up close to the original position. These images were scaled and color corrected before being reinserted. The results of this completed manual were posted on the collaboration projects page at http://projects.twin-cities-transhumanists.org/tdcs-tacs-tms.


To do:
  • Use a test subject to assemble unit
  • Revise manual
  • Create Instructable

Journal Page


The rest of the posts for this project have been arranged by date.

A list showing of all the final posts of COMPLETED projects.


This disclaimer must be intact and whole. This disclaimer must be included if a project is distributed.

All information in this blog, or linked by this blog, are not to be taken as advice or solicitation. Anyone attempting to replicate, in whole or in part, is responsible for the outcome and procedure. Any loss of functionality, money, property or similar, is the responsibility of those involved in the replication.

All digital communication regarding the email address 24hourengineer@gmail.com becomes the intellectual property of Brian McEvoy. Any information contained within these messages may be distributed or retained at the discretion of Brian McEvoy. Any email sent to this address, or any email account owned by Brian McEvoy, cannot be used to claim property or assets.

Comments to the blog may be utilized or erased at the discretion of the owner. No one posting may claim claim property or assets based on their post.

This blog, including pictures and text, is copyright to Brian McEvoy.